New research is showing that climate change may be shifting more tornadoes into the southeastern states.The Magnolia State is in an area of increased tornado activity known as Dixie Alley. The area stretches from parts of Texas to Georgia. Researchers say storms in these areas are more violent, with more long-tracked tornadoes than anywhere else in the country.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says since January 2019, 99 of the nation’s 120 tornado-related deaths – 83% — have occurred in the Southeast. In the 2010s, NOAA says 54% of tornado deaths occurred in the Southeast, up from 25% in the 1980s. Because of the increase in tornado deaths, NOAA launched the VORTEX-SE project in 2016 to study tornadoes in the Southeast and try to improve warnings and education on killer storms. A 2016 study from Purdue University says that climate change is linked to this increase in tornado activity. The study found that the ongoing mega-drought in the western U.S. is creating unfavorable conditions in traditional Tornado Alley, like the Southern Great Plains. In turn, this is pushing more favorable conditions for tornadoes eastward to many places, like the Southeast.Watch the video above to learn about the link between tornadoes and climate.

New research is showing that climate change may be shifting more tornadoes into the southeastern states.

The Magnolia State is in an area of increased tornado activity known as Dixie Alley. The area stretches from parts of Texas to Georgia. Researchers say storms in these areas are more violent, with more long-tracked tornadoes than anywhere else in the country.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says since January 2019, 99 of the nation’s 120 tornado-related deaths – 83% — have occurred in the Southeast. In the 2010s, NOAA says 54% of tornado deaths occurred in the Southeast, up from 25% in the 1980s.

Because of the increase in tornado deaths, NOAA launched the VORTEX-SE project in 2016 to study tornadoes in the Southeast and try to improve warnings and education on killer storms.

A 2016 study from Purdue University says that climate change is linked to this increase in tornado activity. The study found that the ongoing mega-drought in the western U.S. is creating unfavorable conditions in traditional Tornado Alley, like the Southern Great Plains. In turn, this is pushing more favorable conditions for tornadoes eastward to many places, like the Southeast.

Watch the video above to learn about the link between tornadoes and climate.



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