MUSIC

The Atlanta Opera brings Bluebird’s Castle, a contemporary opera about the loss of a loved one to dementia, to Bobbie Baiey & Family Performance Center on the Kennesaw State University campus Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The production stars Michael Mayes, and is directed by Daisy Evans and conducted by Stephen Higgins who both helmed the acclaimed London version of this production. Mayes told ArtsATL’s Mark Thomas Ketterson that the opera is an emotional experience and you could hear open sobbing at the end of the show when they staged it in London. Tickets start at $20.

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Georgia Symphony Orchestra and Chorus
The Georgia Symphony Orchestra and Chorus shares the stage Saturday with the Uzee Brown Society of Choraliers for the program “Walk Together, Children.”

The Georgia Symphony Orchestra and Chorus shares the stage Saturday at 3 p.m. with the Uzee Brown Society of Choraliers for the program “Walk Together, Children.” The program will include Hoagy Carmichael’s “Georgia On My Mind,” Oscar Peterson’s “Hymn To Freedom” and Richard Jackson’s arrangement of “Rock My Soul.” The Uzee Brown Society of Choraliers was founded in 2009 by Morehouse College’s chair of the department of music to perform, preserve and promote Black music traditions. The performance is at the Zion Baptist Church in Marietta. Free.

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BOOKS

Pulitzer Prize-winning war correspondent and best-selling author Thomas E. Ricks will discuss his new book, Waging A Good War, on Tuesday as part of the Atlanta History Center’s Author Talks series. Ricks’ book takes a fresh perspective on the civil rights movement and how its leaders used military strategies in the fight for racial equality. Ricks highlights some of the lesser-known figures of the movement, including James Lawson, James Bevel, Diane Nash and Septima Clark. The program will be on Tuesday in McElreath Hall at 7 p.m. Tickets for non-members start at $10.

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ART+DESIGN

Todd Murphy’s “Wink” is one of the works by the late painter to be shown at the Bill Lowe Gallery in October.

The late Todd Murphy is the much-loved, immensely influential Atlanta artist who got away. The latter part of his career was spent in New York, but during the 1990s he was a giant in the Atlanta art world. The Bill Lowe Gallery launched Murphy’s career with his first solo exhibition in the early ‘90s and the gallery is now handling the artist’s estate. WINK is the first posthumous exhibit of Murphy’s work and pays tribute to Black jockey James “Jimmy” Winkfield who won the Kentucky Derby in 1901 and 1902. The show includes Murphy’s photography, sculpture, paintings and mixed media, much of it never before seen. Through November 4. Opening reception Friday 6-9 p.m.

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The Deana Lawson exhibit at the High Museum of Art is the first museum survey dedicated to the artist; it opens Friday. Working primarily in photography, Lawson investigates and challenges conventional representations of Black identities and bodies. Her work evokes a range of photographic histories and styles, including family albums, studio portraits and staged tableaux in which people are pictured in intimate domestic spaces and public settings. These intimate scenes channel broader ideas about individual and social histories, sexuality and spiritual beliefs. Lawson creates her images throughout the African diaspora from Brooklyn to Haiti, Ethiopia, Brazil and the American South. Through February 19. Tickets $16.50. Members and children free.

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She has 100,000 Instagram followers and satirizes the art market with a sharp wit. The Wall Street Journal called her the art critic for the new generation. Now, drumroll, she is making her Atlanta debut at eyedrum on Saturday. It’s Jerry Gogosian, the online alter ego of artist Hilde Lynne Helphenstein.  She will chat with Art Paper’s Sarah Higgins at 3 p.m. following a lecture on the “Secrets of Color Theory” by SCAD professor emerita Marcia Cohen. It’s part of eyedrum’s new exhibit Idea + Place: The Legacy of Black Mountain College (through November 12). Black Mountain was founded in 1933 in Asheville, North Carolina, as a unique experiment in the arts. Notable faculty and students included Josef and Anni Albers, Robert Rauschenberg, Willem and Elaine de Kooning and Buckminster Fuller. Event starts at 2 p.m. 515 Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard SW. Free.

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DANCE

Morgan Hogan Danceworks
Monica Hogan Danceworks presents its first full evening concert in Atlanta this weekend at Emory’s Performing Arts Studio.

Monica Hogan Danceworks presents its first full evening concert in Atlanta this weekend at Emory’s Performing Arts Studio. As Hogan Thysell told ArtsATL senior editor Gillian Anne Renault, she is recreating a 40-minute work, Resilient Paradise, that was first performed by Thysell’s New York company in 2019. Ironically, the work is about resiliency in the face of immense challenges, a theme that has gained even more relevance in light of the pandemic. The 11-member ensemble will also perform a selection of Thysell’s shorter works. Saturday 7:30 p.m. Sunday 3 p.m.

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Beacon Dance premieres HydroCartography at Rodney Cook Sr. Park on Saturday as part of ELEVATE’s public art program. The work takes its inspiration from the park itself, which was designed to process excess storm water runoff, and from the people who regularly inhabit the area. Described as “an entertaining and evocative experience” for both performers and audience, it will take place from 2-3 p.m. Free.

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Georgia Ballet is known for its dedication to the classics and family-friendly programming. This weekend they will present a perennial favorite, Peter Pan, at the Jennie T. Anderson Theatre in Marietta. Audience members are encouraged to attend dressed in the costume of their favorite Peter Pan character. The 7 p.m. Thursday performance runs only one hour, designed for children and adults who have different visual and auditory sensitivities. Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sunday at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets run from $10 to $36.

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THEATER

Can you sing the words to “Summer Lovin’” along with the late Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta? If you love the original Grease, check out its controversial cousin, VAPE: THE MUSICAL, opening this Saturday at The Village Theatre and presented by Sketchworks Comedy. Featuring all your favorite characters — from Sandy to Danny to Rizzo plus the rest of the Pink Ladies — this eyebrow-raising performance has a modern twist that will have you laughing out loud. Tickets are $20 ahead of time or $29 at the door. 

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Stage Door Theatre
“Ordinary Days,” a feel-good, light-hearted musical, will run through October 16 (Photo by The Creative Raven)

Atlantans will relate to Ordinary Days, playing this weekend at Stage Door Theatre and showing how life in a city — New York, in this case — can be tough, but connecting with true friends is the key to self-fulfillment. Directed by Keena Redding, who commented to ArtsATL writer Jim Farmer that Stage Door Theatre now feels more welcoming and diverse, this musical has “vibrant, toe-tapping songs” and is “surprisingly parallel to life.” Tickets are $35, with discounts available. 

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Immerse yourself in the creepy season with Misery, opening this weekend at Onstage Atlanta Theatre Company. Written by William Goldman, directed by Brandon Mitchell and based on the beloved Stephen King novel, Misery follows the unfortunate tale of how the romance novelist Paul Sheldon, who is “rescued” from a car crash by Annie Wilkes, wakes up as a captive in her home and must write to suit her deranged specifications. 3041 N. Decatur Road, Scottdale, Georgia. Tickets start at $20 each. 





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