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I probably drink too much coffee (she says to herself, bolting awake at 3 a.m.), but my Nespresso makes it all too easy when the early afternoon slump hits. I’ve thought about trying to switch to tea, but — even though I know it’s seriously not that much trouble — I’ve never wanted to bother boiling water and waiting for tea to steep. Especially not when I have easier-than-instant coffee.

But then I saw the sleek little number from Cuzen that serves up matcha tea with — wait for it — the press of one button! If you know anything about matcha, you likely know that the method for making it is deeply rooted in tradition. Making matcha is more like a ritual. A ritual that calls for a special whisk, which you use to briskly-but-delicately blend the tea until it’s absorbed into the water. A machine that could make the drink for me? I needed to know more.

Cuzen, with its pretty little cube design, is a do-it-all device that gives you a foamy, fresh matcha with literally no mess or fuss.

I’ve been using it for a while and it’s ridiculously easy. A ceramic mill on top holds a packet of partially crushed matcha leaves (enough for up to 20 cups, so you’re not fiddling around with individual servings, or throwing away tons of waste). And a whisking cup sits in place beneath the grinder, with help from a magnet base. You add water to the whisking cup, make sure you’ve got your leaves in the grinder, and watch the machine make magic.

After you choose your brew strength and hit start, the mill grinds the leaves and shoots them into the whisking cup, which whisks the tea into the waiting water. It’s mesmerizing watching the tea turn deeper and deeper green and froth up as it whisks. That’s good, though, because it makes the time pass. Yes, it’s exponentially faster than the DIY way, but it can feel like a long time to wait when you’re just, well, waiting. Luckily, the machine beeps when it’s done.

Now, the fun part: the matcha! It does make incredible-tasting matcha. A smooth, vegetal, nutty, slightly sweet cup of matcha. Do you want a matcha latte, maybe on ice? How about a sparkling matcha, with fizzy water, ice, lime, and mint? Or maybe you want to add matcha to desserts or overnight oats? Like I said, it all requires just a press of a button!

Any cons? This thing isn’t cheap, ringing in well north of 300 bucks. It’s also kind of noisy. And it does take up some real estate on the counter, so you have to be sure you’ll really use it.

Note: We secured a special deal for Kitchn readers! Now through October 31, 2021, you can save 10 percent when you order a starter kit. Use the code CUZENKT10 at checkout.

Well, is it truly one of the best inventions of the year, like Time says? I can see a serious tea enthusiast getting pretty excited. Personally, I love it. And I’m definitely drinking less coffee.

Are you a matcha drinker? Would you be able to put this good use? Discuss in the comments below!

Dana McMahan

Contributor

Freelance writer Dana McMahan is a chronic adventurer, serial learner, and whiskey enthusiast based in Louisville, Kentucky.





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