As a mental health counselor, Alex Wilson said more clients are also coming to him because of the uptick in violence close to home, expressing having more feelings of anxiety.”Pretty much all feelings of anxiety are based off the need to control what’s going on,” Wilson said. “When incidents and violence and shootings happen, they’re beyond our control and they remind us of that.”The first step of managing anxiety, according to Wilson, is acknowledging how you’re feeling and knowing that it’s OK. He also recommends identifying what triggered those feelings, even going so far as to make a physical list. He said doing this should not be a source of panic, rather a way of taking control of your current situation. “Say to yourself, ‘That’s happening. it’s making me a little nervous. That’s OK.’ It’s literally marking things as safe or unsafe,” Wilson explained. “Understand how this is affecting you personally. Maybe you had a past trauma, post-traumatic stress, previous shooting or an incident. Or you went through abuse. Anything of that nature.”Once they figure out what’s triggering anxiety or any other feeling, Wilson tells his clients to figure out if any part of their situation can change. Like if they’re at a grocery store and start thinking about a possible shooting happening, maybe they walk to another aisle or even back to their car to take some deep breaths.One trigger Wilson specifically noted is prevalent for a lot of people is watching and consuming news, whether that’s in traditional cable formats or whatever pops up on social media. Like any other trigger, he said a way to take control is to change the environment: exiting the app, turning off the TV or just going for a walk.Overall, the activities Wilson talked about all relate back to self care. From relaxation exercises to journaling to physical exercise, incorporating distracting activities into your routine creates a way for you to control your personal anxiety. Finally, Wilson said, talk to your support system.”If you need to see someone professionally, that’s ok. There’s nothing wrong with that. That’s why we’re here, no judgment,” he said. “Whoever you talk to, it’s simply to feel validated. More people need to feel heard. Even if we can’t fix it or cure it or solve it. As long as they’re validated that the feeling is a normal feeling and know there are some things that might help.” If you or someone you know is in emotional distress, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7: 1-800-273-8255.Watch the video above for the full story.

As a mental health counselor, Alex Wilson said more clients are also coming to him because of the uptick in violence close to home, expressing having more feelings of anxiety.

“Pretty much all feelings of anxiety are based off the need to control what’s going on,” Wilson said. “When incidents and violence and shootings happen, they’re beyond our control and they remind us of that.”

The first step of managing anxiety, according to Wilson, is acknowledging how you’re feeling and knowing that it’s OK. He also recommends identifying what triggered those feelings, even going so far as to make a physical list. He said doing this should not be a source of panic, rather a way of taking control of your current situation.

“Say to yourself, ‘That’s happening. it’s making me a little nervous. That’s OK.’ It’s literally marking things as safe or unsafe,” Wilson explained. “Understand how this is affecting you personally. Maybe you had a past trauma, post-traumatic stress, previous shooting or an incident. Or you went through abuse. Anything of that nature.”

Once they figure out what’s triggering anxiety or any other feeling, Wilson tells his clients to figure out if any part of their situation can change. Like if they’re at a grocery store and start thinking about a possible shooting happening, maybe they walk to another aisle or even back to their car to take some deep breaths.

One trigger Wilson specifically noted is prevalent for a lot of people is watching and consuming news, whether that’s in traditional cable formats or whatever pops up on social media. Like any other trigger, he said a way to take control is to change the environment: exiting the app, turning off the TV or just going for a walk.

Overall, the activities Wilson talked about all relate back to self care. From relaxation exercises to journaling to physical exercise, incorporating distracting activities into your routine creates a way for you to control your personal anxiety.

Finally, Wilson said, talk to your support system.

“If you need to see someone professionally, that’s ok. There’s nothing wrong with that. That’s why we’re here, no judgment,” he said. “Whoever you talk to, it’s simply to feel validated. More people need to feel heard. Even if we can’t fix it or cure it or solve it. As long as they’re validated that the feeling is a normal feeling and know there are some things that might help.”

If you or someone you know is in emotional distress, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7: 1-800-273-8255.

Watch the video above for the full story.



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