We independently select these products—if you buy from one of our links, we may earn a commission.

Ever since I was generously gifted a 4-quart Cocotte for my birthday two years ago, I’ve become something of a Staub enthusiast. I’m always on the lookout for new pieces to add to my growing collection, and when given the chance to help someone find the perfect gift or wedding registry item, I always point them to the brand’s indispensable cocotte. The only thing I feel slightly guilty about is how expensive it is. As in, over $450 expensive. Ouch. Lucky for me, I recently scored one of the brand’s newer designs — 5-quart Tall Cocotte — on major sale. And, for a limited time, you can, too! Regularly priced at $486, the 5-qt. tall cocotte is almost a whopping 60 percent off right now. If a sale like that isn’t enough to inspire you to add one to your cart, let me tell you a little bit about the most-used piece of cookware in my kitchen.

First, I’ll admit, I didn’t really need another Cocotte, and until I started using the 5-quart tall model, I was dubious that I’d really even notice the difference in capacity. After all, how much more can I do with an extra quart? As it turns out, a lot

The extra volume is in the height, rather than width, of the pot, and I’m now able to make my favorite soup recipe without scaling it down like I have to do in my 4-quart cocotte. The recipe requires a long, steady simmer, which can be hard to manage using a large stainless steel stockpot. Staub’s heavy cast iron construction retains and distributes heat beautifully, allowing me to soften vegetables before adding stock, and then keeping recipes at a low, even simmer. I’ve used the tall pot to soak and then braise large batches of brothy beans, and it brings water to a boil very quickly when covered, making it my go-to for cooking potatoes and pasta.

I also love the extra headspace that the tall Cocotte offers when I’m cooking bulky or irregularly-shaped items like meat. The textured black matte cooking surface yields perfectly-browned meats and vegetables, and the extra height of the pot means I can nestle a few more short ribs or chicken thighs into the pot when I’m braising. Ingredients have plenty of room to bubble away and get super tender, whether I’m cooking on the stovetop or in the oven.

Staub’s lid also comes in handy with braising and slow cooking, and I’ll be honest, it is not lightweight. But this has its advantages, including offering a superior seal so recipes’ flavorful juices and moisture stay in the pot, and the lid won’t slide off if you use it to partially cover the pot. The underside of the lid has tiny bumps on it to encourage any condensation to drip back into the pot, so recipes don’t dry out.

But what I love most about the Staub is the fact that I can trust it to maintain an even temperature across the entire cooking surface, even the sides of the pot. I recently made a tomato sauce that required softening onion and garlic for 15 minutes over medium heat. I was worried they’d burn without constant stirring, (this would certainly happen in one of my stainless steel saucepans), but the Staub distributed the heat so well, I was able to stir just a few times and even walk away, and still got perfectly translucent onions. 

Last but not least, I’ve been making Jim Lahey’s No Knead Bread interchangeably in my 4-quart and 5-quart tall Cocottes for almost a year now, and haven’t noticed a difference. They both produce gorgeous, brown, crunchy crusts and tender centers. The only advantage I could see to using the taller model would be if you wanted to make a bigger recipe, which I’ve yet to try.

If it wasn’t obvious by now, I highly suggest taking advantage of this great deal and picking up your own tall Cocotte. I look forward to braising, baking, and cooking in mine for many, many years. If you want to join the fan club, pick up Staub’s 5-quart Tall Cocotte in White here. And, psst, if you prefer another color, the Dark Blue, Graphite Grey, and Grenadine tones are priced at just $20 more.

Vanessa Spilios

Contributor

Vanessa received her culinary training at Boston U. and has a background in housewares product development & marketing. When not testing appliances or developing recipes, she spends her time drawing and tending to her small but mighty porch garden.





Source link