Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium is celebrating a milestone year with involvement in their first-ever repatriation effort for western boreal toads and the release of their 100,000th amphibian into the wild.This is the first time the zoo has participated in a reintroduction effort for the western boreal toad recovery program since joining the effort in 1995.The zoo sent off 3,847 western boreal toad tadpoles, metamorphs, and adults to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources for release in the Paunsaugunt Plateau area near Bryce Canyon National Park on Aug. 18, and Sept. 9 and what started as just 30 toads in August of 2020 has grown quickly seeing the toadlets morphed into adults and another 3,847 tadpoles were born by July 2021.Western boreal toads are just one of at least six major amphibian recovery programs currently supported by Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium Amphibian Conservation Area.The sustainability and recovery of the population has not been an easy road. Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium has played a vital role in amphibian conservation since 1992. In 1992 the Wyoming Game and Fish Department provided the zoo with its first shipment of Wyoming toads.This specific amphibian was thought to be extinct but a very small population was found in Albany County, Wyoming, at Mortenson Lake. In 1989 the last 10 remaining Wyoming toads in the wild were brought to the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo.Since then multiple zoos have become part of the effort to restore the amphibian population by building assurance colonies, or in-house breeding populations, at their respective zoos.The Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium Amphibian Conservation Area was established following the 2005 release of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Global Amphibian Assessment and with only three full-time keepers has supported the release of 109,964 amphibians to date. More information is available at www.OmahaZoo.com.

Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium is celebrating a milestone year with involvement in their first-ever repatriation effort for western boreal toads and the release of their 100,000th amphibian into the wild.

western boreal toad

Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium

This is the first time the zoo has participated in a reintroduction effort for the western boreal toad recovery program since joining the effort in 1995.

The zoo sent off 3,847 western boreal toad tadpoles, metamorphs, and adults to the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources for release in the Paunsaugunt Plateau area near Bryce Canyon National Park on Aug. 18, and Sept. 9 and what started as just 30 toads in August of 2020 has grown quickly seeing the toadlets morphed into adults and another 3,847 tadpoles were born by July 2021.

Western boreal toads are just one of at least six major amphibian recovery programs currently supported by Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium Amphibian Conservation Area.

The sustainability and recovery of the population has not been an easy road. Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium has played a vital role in amphibian conservation since 1992. In 1992 the Wyoming Game and Fish Department provided the zoo with its first shipment of Wyoming toads.

This specific amphibian was thought to be extinct but a very small population was found in Albany County, Wyoming, at Mortenson Lake. In 1989 the last 10 remaining Wyoming toads in the wild were brought to the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo.

Since then multiple zoos have become part of the effort to restore the amphibian population by building assurance colonies, or in-house breeding populations, at their respective zoos.

The Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium Amphibian Conservation Area was established following the 2005 release of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Global Amphibian Assessment and with only three full-time keepers has supported the release of 109,964 amphibians to date.

More information is available at www.OmahaZoo.com.



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